DONATE

East Tennessee Miniature Horse and Donkey Rescue is 100% donation funded and we rely on donations in order to do big things for little equines. Donations help provide for:

  • Emergency vet care

  • Farrier costs

  • Hay and grain 

  • Maintaining the shelters and fields that house the rescues

  • Any on going medical needs

  • Everyday items like grooming supplies and halters

  • Transport costs

  • Owner surrender minis being vetted

  • Educating the public on the plight of unwanted, abused, and/or neglected minis


ETMHD is not funded by any grants, only by people who want to make a difference.

 

We help over 100 minis a year. At any given time there are 30 plus minis at our main rescue site.

  • The average cost to feed a mini for one month is $35 dollars

  • A specialized farrier visit is $40

  • Average vet costs per mini on intake is $250 

Wishlist items 

 

You can donate a new or used item or click the donate button to help us acquire these items for the minis that need them.

  • buckets and rubber pans

  • small water troughs

  • horse medical supplies

  • mini sized halters

  • salt blocks and holders

  • miniature horse feed

  • mare and foal feed

  • bedding/shavings

  • shampoo and conditioner

  • grooming supplies

  • a mini in every home

One Time Donation

*Don't have PayPal? Don't worry, you can contact us at 865-266-3396 to set up a monthly donation or you may also a mail your donation to: 

ETMHD Rescue

6545 Calloway Rd

Loudon, TN 37774 

Carrots

 

 

 

They have never had a carrot. They don’t know what it is or what to do with it, so it shrivels on the ground. They are eager for grass, clean hay, and fresh water. A nice shady shelter is long awaited and soothing from the blistering sun and punishing rains.

 

They come in with briars and fairy locks in their hair, with over grown hooves that need attention. Ropes, halters, and the sound of a human voice causes so much fear. 

 

Their hooves cause them to high-step away so they do not trip. They find their stride, the whites of their eyes showing as they run from the human’s approach. The touch of a human hand makes their skin crawl like the bite of a fly. The humans watch with tears streaming down their cheeks at the shuddering flesh and fearful eyes.

 

They watch the other horses, the ones who were here before they came. The other horses who nicker a greeting and crowd the humans walking beside them. Their eyes follow the others that are looking for a pat or special treat, maybe a carrot. They don’t run as far or fast as they watch intently.

 

The humans have ropes and halters but their quiet tranquil words begin to take away the fear. The people don’t push or punish, rather, they ask for friendship. A new understanding starts to form, and they begin to hover at the edge of the herd. They walk forward with the other horses and accept a touch on the nose without shuddering or bolting.

 

Halters have become a common object, and feet are trimmed regularly and without much fuss. They, the ones who once feared humans, now allow scratches under their manes and other hard to reach places. They, who once shuttered to the human touch, now approach at the front of the group and take a carrot. The bonds of understanding and companionship have started forming and are blossoming.

 

New people come and they, the once fearful ones, greet them with a nicker. A new person offers a carrot, a pat, and a halter; they walk together. A new life has begun with their new people. As they leave, they call to another group of wild ones coming in, telling them it will be okay. Telling them to take the carrot. That the fear and shuddering of the skin will not last long here.

 

This is not the story of a wild horse, rather, it is the story of the horse that was neglected in a backfield or abandoned at auction. This is the story of the rescue horses of America. Adopt. Foster. Volunteer. Donate. Educate. Offer these fearful horses a carrot, and watch as the healing begins and their trust flourishes with your help.

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DOING BIG THINGS FOR LITTLE EQUINES